Ashtanga Vinyasa

Strength & Sincerity
The simplicity of the system at the heart of the practice

It is a yoga practice, based on dynamic and stimulating sequences of asanas to build spiritual strength, which combines the principles of the eight Ashtanga branches of Patanjali and the development of VINYASA (synchronization of movement on breathing) by T. Krishnamacharya and K. Pattabhi Jois.

In addition to this, you will need to know more about it.

The Ashtanga Yoga method is a living tradition with the teacher-student relationship at the epicenter. At its root, it is a spiritual practice that purifies the heart, body and mind, illuminating its own divine nature.

 

To achieve this, we work with 3 places of important action and attention called TRISTANA . These cover three levels of purification: the body, the nervous system and the mind. They are always done in conjunction with each other. Asanas posture helps to purify, strengthen and give flexibility to the body. The breathing must be stable, slow and inhabit the whole body, same length at the inspiration as at the expiration, which allows to purify the nervous system. Dristhi is the direction you look in a pose. There are nine dristhis: the nose, 3rd eye, navel, thumb, hands, feet, top, right side and left side. Dristhi purifies and stabilizes the functioning of the mind. Tristana is the foundation of the practice of A shtanga Vinyasa Y oga. These three tools transform the practice of asana (physical) from a simple bodily exercise into a total mind-body experience.

There are 6 Ashtanga series. The first was designed to realign and detoxify the body. The intermediate series has an impact on the purification of the nervous system. Most students get all the benefits of the first two sets, and only a few go to the advanced sets which promote divine stability. All levels of practice will lead to a greater degree of comfort.

With regular practice, and when the three components (Tristana) are in harmony, synchronized with movement and breathing through the sequences of postures, the yogi (the sadhaka) enters the seventh part of Ashtanga Yoga, meditation (dhyana), then to come into a state of yoga. In order to regain its integrity.

An essential aspect of the internal purification that Pattabhi Jois teaches concerns the six poisons which surround the spiritual heart. In the yoga shastra, it is said that God dwells in our heart in the form of light, but this light is covered by six poisons: kama, krodha, moha, lobha, matsarya and mada. These are desire, anger, delusion, greed, envy, and laziness . When the practice of yoga is sustained with great diligence and dedication over a long period of time, the heat generated by it burns these poisons, and the light of our inner nature is revealed.

" When we are attentive to our actions, we are not prisoners of our habits "